Lincoln is what you might describe as a biopic with a difference. Director Steven Spielberg chooses to train the camera on the last four months of America’s beloved (sixteenth) President Abraham Lincoln’s life in 1865, as he endeavors, with almost superhuman effort, to abolish slavery before the Civil War ends. We don’t see a young Abe Lincoln; this is a stately, fatherly President, going off into rambling stories to elucidate a point or spending sleepless nights wandering around the White House while he worries about his nation and grieves over his dead son. And yet, this is an unforgettable portrait of a man who rewrote history, mainly because actor Daniel Day-Lewis steps into the President’s shoes and feels the character in his bones.

The film itself is dense and difficult to work through, steeped as it is in talky scenes as Lincoln tries every trick in his book, including horse-trading and some twisting of facts, to get the amendment passed. Despite Oscar-nominated writer Tony Kushner’s wonderful wordplay, you often feel as if you’re trapped in a classroom, wrestling with dry history.

Things pick up in the second half as the House debates the proposed Bill, and Spielberg works in tense drama into the scenes of final vote-counting. Much of this has to do with Tommy Lee Jones’s electric performance as radical anti-slavery Congressman Thaddeus Stevens; the actor walks away with all the best lines and moments. Sally Field as Lincoln’s wife Mary, and the mother-in-mourning, does a fine job, but it’s hard even for an actress of her caliber to not be overshadowed in the presence of Daniel Day-Lewis.

Here is a man born to play Lincoln with all his layers; an adored President, a man so tormented by the Civil War that he  “ages ten years in four”, a raconteur, a clever politician and a father both playful and stern to his sons. What stays with you in the end, is Lincoln’s steely moral compass – so focused on abolishing the inhuman practice of slavery that he poured every bit of himself into that ambition.

I’m going with three and a half out of five for Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln. It’s far from an easy watch, but its important story and the towering central performance demands that you make time for it.

деньги в долг под расписку в тольяттикредитные карты онлайнкредитная карта сбербанка momentum отзывыонлайн заявка на кредитную карту с доставкой

Did you like this blog?*
How did you find this blog?*
What kind of articles would you like to read on the blog?*
Name:*
E-mail:*

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ eight = 16

More in Rajeev Masand

  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Secret Superstar

    Lost in her own thoughts during an English class, a distracted student is pulled up by the teacher and caned when...

    BMS EditorOctober 20, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Golmaal Again

    I suppose it’s true: film critics are entirely unreasonable people. After endlessly complaining that the last two “Golmaal” films were like...

    BMS EditorOctober 20, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Tu Hai Mera Sunday

    Cast: Barun Sobti, Shahana Goswami, Vishal Malhotra, Avinash Tiwary, Nakul Bhalla, Jay Upadhyay Director: Milind Dhaimade Sunday is just one of those days of...

    BMS EditorOctober 6, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Chef

    Cast: Saif Ali Khan, Padmapriya Janakiraman, Svar Kamble, Milind Soman, Chandan Roy Sanyal, Sobhita Dhulipala Director: Raja Krishna Menon As feel-good films go, Chef,...

    BMS EditorOctober 6, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of American Made

    Cast: Tom Cruise, Sarah Wright, Domhnall Gleeson, Jayma Mays, Jesse Plemons, Caleb Landry Jones Director: Doug Liman It’s been a while since Tom...

    BMS EditorSeptember 29, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Judwaa 2

    Cast: Varun Dhawan, Jacqueline Fernandez, Tapsee Pannu, Rajpal Yadav, Vivaan Bhatena, Upasana Singh, Anupam Kher, Sachin Khedekar, Manoj Pahwa  Director: David Dhawan Judwaa...

    BMS EditorSeptember 29, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Newton

    Cast: Rajkummar Rao, Pankaj Tripathi, Raghubir Yadav, Anjali Patil, Mukesh Prajapati Director: Amit V Masurkar Above all things, Newton, directed by Amit Masurkar, is...

    BMS EditorSeptember 22, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Haseena Parkar

    Cast: Shraddha Kapoor, Siddhant Kapoor, Ankur Bhatia Director: Apoorva Lakhia It’s bad enough that Shraddha Kapoor looks nothing like the real Haseena Parkar...

    BMS EditorSeptember 22, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Lucknow Central

    In Lucknow Central, a bunch of desperate prison inmates turn to music in the hope of securing their freedom. Surface-level similarities to Qaidi...

    BMS EditorSeptember 15, 2017

All articles/blogs are intended to inform, entertain and amuse. We make no representations or guarantees about the truth, accuracy or quality of any content.

Copyright 2017 © Bigtree Entertainment Pvt. Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Subscribe To Our Newsletter
Subscribe to our email newsletter today to receive updates on the latest news!
Thank You For Subscribing To Us!

Now get regular updates on the latest entertainment news and style trends.

Providing you with the best of Bollywood, Hollywood, style and more.
Get the best in entertainment, while keeping yourself entertained!
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
Don't miss out. Subscribe today.
×
×
WordPress Popup