Rajeev Masand’s Movie Review of Mirzya

There’s a lot to admire in Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra’s Mirzya, but coherent narrative and compelling characters are not among its strengths. 
Based on the Punjabi folk tale of Mirza-Sahiba, the film, written by Gulzar, cuts between two timelines – the now, and the who-knows-where-and-when. In both timelines, newcomers Harshvardhan Kapoor and Saiyami Kher play the star-crossed lovers.
The track rooted in an unspecified Game of Thrones-style setting sees a scruffy warrior win some sort of archery competition against armor-clad horsemen, and make off with a visibly impressed princess. Unfolding largely in slow motion and without a single line of dialogue, this scenario ends tragically. Sticking faithfully to the original folklore, it prompts the question – why did she betray him?
The other track, which places the same story within the context of modern day Rajasthan, features a pair of 12-year-old sweethearts named Monish and Suchitra who’re separated when he flees the city after committing a heinous crime. Years later their love is tested again when she discovers he’s been working as a stable-boy at the estate of her fiancé, a prince (Anuj Choudhry).
Mehra, who blurred the lines between past and present so skillfully in Rang De Basanti, has trouble pulling off the same tropes in Mirzya. The story doesn’t sit convincingly in the present day portions, and key triggers come off looking contrived.
For a film inspired by a legendary romance, it’s a shame the lovers in Mirzya can’t quite set the screen on fire. Both Harshvardhan and Saiyami have potential individually, but they fail to muster up the passion required for the kind of timeless love story that this film so desperately wants to be.
There’s more heat between the dancers in the sensuously choreographed song sequences that pop up in the film at regular intervals. These highly stylized ‘music videos’, set to meaningful lyrics by Gulzar, and glorious folksy tunes by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, give Mirzya the feel of a true-blue musical.
The other highlight of the film is Polish cinematographer Pawel Dyllus’ exquisite lensing of both the stark Ladakh landscapes against which the fantasy track unfolds, and the breathtaking expanses of Rajasthan deserts and palaces amidst which the other track unravels.
Of the cast, British actor Art Malik, playing Suchitra’s police officer father, is a real hoot particularly in one hammy scene that’ll leave you chuckling uncontrollably. The beautiful Saiyami Kher has a striking presence on screen, and Harshvardhan Kapoor uses his piercing eyes to convey intensity. In the histrionics department, however, both are evidently raw.
In the end Mirzya is a misfire, despite its staggering ambition and its remarkable technical achievements. I’m going with two out of five.

Did you like this blog?*
How did you find this blog?*
What kind of articles would you like to read on the blog?*
Name:*
E-mail:*

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


1 × = one

More in Rajeev Masand

  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Tu Hai Mera Sunday

    Cast: Barun Sobti, Shahana Goswami, Vishal Malhotra, Avinash Tiwary, Nakul Bhalla, Jay Upadhyay Director: Milind Dhaimade Sunday is just one of those days of...

    BMS EditorOctober 6, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Chef

    Cast: Saif Ali Khan, Padmapriya Janakiraman, Svar Kamble, Milind Soman, Chandan Roy Sanyal, Sobhita Dhulipala Director: Raja Krishna Menon As feel-good films go, Chef,...

    BMS EditorOctober 6, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of American Made

    Cast: Tom Cruise, Sarah Wright, Domhnall Gleeson, Jayma Mays, Jesse Plemons, Caleb Landry Jones Director: Doug Liman It’s been a while since Tom...

    BMS EditorSeptember 29, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Judwaa 2

    Cast: Varun Dhawan, Jacqueline Fernandez, Tapsee Pannu, Rajpal Yadav, Vivaan Bhatena, Upasana Singh, Anupam Kher, Sachin Khedekar, Manoj Pahwa  Director: David Dhawan Judwaa...

    BMS EditorSeptember 29, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Newton

    Cast: Rajkummar Rao, Pankaj Tripathi, Raghubir Yadav, Anjali Patil, Mukesh Prajapati Director: Amit V Masurkar Above all things, Newton, directed by Amit Masurkar, is...

    BMS EditorSeptember 22, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Haseena Parkar

    Cast: Shraddha Kapoor, Siddhant Kapoor, Ankur Bhatia Director: Apoorva Lakhia It’s bad enough that Shraddha Kapoor looks nothing like the real Haseena Parkar...

    BMS EditorSeptember 22, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Lucknow Central

    In Lucknow Central, a bunch of desperate prison inmates turn to music in the hope of securing their freedom. Surface-level similarities to Qaidi...

    BMS EditorSeptember 15, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Simran

    Hansal Mehta's cleverly titled new film Simran, starring Kangana Ranaut, has that rarest of things that’s practically gone missing from the movies...

    BMS EditorSeptember 15, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review Of IT

    A big reason that so many horror movies today feel underwhelming may have little to do with the films at all....

    BMS EditorSeptember 8, 2017

All articles/blogs are intended to inform, entertain and amuse. We make no representations or guarantees about the truth, accuracy or quality of any content.

Copyright 2017 © Bigtree Entertainment Pvt. Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Subscribe To Our Newsletter
Subscribe to our email newsletter today to receive updates on the latest news!
Thank You For Subscribing To Us!

Now get regular updates on the latest entertainment news and style trends.

Providing you with the best of Bollywood, Hollywood, style and more.
Get the best in entertainment, while keeping yourself entertained!
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
Don't miss out. Subscribe today.
×
×
WordPress Popup