Rajeev Masand’s Movie Review of Haraamkhor

If you had even the tiniest doubt or uncertainty about Nawazauddin Siddiqui’s place in the pantheon of great Indian actors, you only have to watch him in Haraamkhor. He plays a selfish, manipulative teacher who begins a relationship with an underage female student, and it’s a performance steeped in subtlety and complexity.
The film is set in a North Indian village where Siddiqui’s character, a married schoolteacher named Shyam, tutors young boys and girls in his tiny home. Sandhya (Shweta Tripathi), a motherless girl whose police officer father is mostly drunk or too disconnected to notice, develops a crush on Shyam.
She’s not the only one with love on her mind though. Kamal (Irrfan Khan), a scraggly fellow three years her junior, is infatuated with Sandhya. But having broken both his arms, he must rely on his best friend Mintu (Mohammed Samad) for help in trying to win her heart. Their efforts towards this end involve all manner of harebrained plotting, including a plan to trick Sandhya into seeing Kamal naked after he’s spied on her in the shower.
Director Shlok Sharma creates a vivid portrait of life in small-town India. He has both an eye and an ear for detail, giving us characters that look and talk like real people in these parts. There are fathers who’re hiding secrets, and wives nursing suspicion. But the film is ultimately an examination of adolescents and their understanding of romantic and sexual relationships. Kamal and Mintu are the only ones in the village who’ve caught on to the affair between Shyam and Sandhya, and we witness much of it through their immature eyes.
Although perceptive and surprisingly humorous despite the sordid relationship at its center, too often Haraamkhor feels disjointed and choppy. There are blanks you’ll need to fill in yourself, and questions that remain unanswered. At times you will wish there was more depth to the writing. 
These hiccups notwithstanding, the film benefits enormously from the convincing performances at its heart. Shweta Tripathi is in good form as the confused, ignored young teenager who can’t help making all the wrong choices, and young ‘uns Irrfan Khan and particularly Mohammed Samad provide non-stop laughs as Kamal and Mintu respectively. But it’s Nawazuddin Siddiqui whose brilliant, mostly understated portrayal of a violent predator is the film’s biggest strength. A scene in which he’s begging his wife not to leave him while trying to put on his trousers at the same time is one of the film’s best bits and a testament to his incredible talent.
I’m going three out of five for Haraamkhor. It’s a compelling story and for the most part it’s well told. 

Did you like this blog?*
How did you find this blog?*
What kind of articles would you like to read on the blog?*
Name:*
E-mail:*

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


− two = 6

More in Rajeev Masand

  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Secret Superstar

    Lost in her own thoughts during an English class, a distracted student is pulled up by the teacher and caned when...

    BMS EditorOctober 20, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Golmaal Again

    I suppose it’s true: film critics are entirely unreasonable people. After endlessly complaining that the last two “Golmaal” films were like...

    BMS EditorOctober 20, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Tu Hai Mera Sunday

    Cast: Barun Sobti, Shahana Goswami, Vishal Malhotra, Avinash Tiwary, Nakul Bhalla, Jay Upadhyay Director: Milind Dhaimade Sunday is just one of those days of...

    BMS EditorOctober 6, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Chef

    Cast: Saif Ali Khan, Padmapriya Janakiraman, Svar Kamble, Milind Soman, Chandan Roy Sanyal, Sobhita Dhulipala Director: Raja Krishna Menon As feel-good films go, Chef,...

    BMS EditorOctober 6, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of American Made

    Cast: Tom Cruise, Sarah Wright, Domhnall Gleeson, Jayma Mays, Jesse Plemons, Caleb Landry Jones Director: Doug Liman It’s been a while since Tom...

    BMS EditorSeptember 29, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Judwaa 2

    Cast: Varun Dhawan, Jacqueline Fernandez, Tapsee Pannu, Rajpal Yadav, Vivaan Bhatena, Upasana Singh, Anupam Kher, Sachin Khedekar, Manoj Pahwa  Director: David Dhawan Judwaa...

    BMS EditorSeptember 29, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Newton

    Cast: Rajkummar Rao, Pankaj Tripathi, Raghubir Yadav, Anjali Patil, Mukesh Prajapati Director: Amit V Masurkar Above all things, Newton, directed by Amit Masurkar, is...

    BMS EditorSeptember 22, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Haseena Parkar

    Cast: Shraddha Kapoor, Siddhant Kapoor, Ankur Bhatia Director: Apoorva Lakhia It’s bad enough that Shraddha Kapoor looks nothing like the real Haseena Parkar...

    BMS EditorSeptember 22, 2017
  • Rajeev Masand’s Review of Lucknow Central

    In Lucknow Central, a bunch of desperate prison inmates turn to music in the hope of securing their freedom. Surface-level similarities to Qaidi...

    BMS EditorSeptember 15, 2017

All articles/blogs are intended to inform, entertain and amuse. We make no representations or guarantees about the truth, accuracy or quality of any content.

Copyright 2017 © Bigtree Entertainment Pvt. Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Subscribe To Our Newsletter
Subscribe to our email newsletter today to receive updates on the latest news!
Thank You For Subscribing To Us!

Now get regular updates on the latest entertainment news and style trends.

Providing you with the best of Bollywood, Hollywood, style and more.
Get the best in entertainment, while keeping yourself entertained!
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
Don't miss out. Subscribe today.
×
×
WordPress Popup